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cops-class-and-race

Cops, class, and race: How the police protect the 1%

As communities across the nation have taken to the streets in the ongoing movement against police brutality, the question of the police and their role in society has taken on new importance. With the police killing a Black person every 28 hours, a movement is emerging the challenges the conventional idea of who they serve and who they protect. The very origins of the institution are saturated with racism and violence. From their beginning as a force to quell strikes, urban riots, and the threat of slave insurrection, the police have always existed primarily as an enforcer for the 1% and a protector of their property.

Join the International Socialist Organization for a discussion about the origins and function of the police and their relationship to racism, class, and capitalism.

race-class-capitalism

Race, Class, and Capitalism

The struggle against the police murder of unarmed Black people has shone a bright light on racism in America. Many have united in mobilizations against racist policing and are asking critical questions about how racism works.

This conversation and engagement on race, class, and capitalism will put forward a radical analysis that clarifies the necessary connection between racism and capitalism and lays out strategic conclusions about anti-racist struggle and revolutionary politics.

"The town hella needs a raise"

Oakland livable wage assembly, inaugural meeting

The Oakland Livable Wage Assembly builds community and power among those who seek higher wages and better work life conditions for area workers.

Our work together encompasses: (1) the concerns of precarious, contingent and care workers; (2) current campaigns to improve wages for low-wage workers; and (3) efforts by unionized workers and unions to improve wages and quality of work life. We share stories and information in an egalitarian and participatory way to build relationships and build the movement.

The Oakland Livable Wage Assembly meets every 2nd and 4th Tuesday. Please join us for an inaugural meeting, January 27.

Black Liberation and Socialism

Black Liberation and Socialism, Part 2

We are continuing our three-part reading series on Black Liberation and Socialism by Ahmed Shawki, “a sharp and insightful analysis of historic movements against racism in the United States—from the separatism of Marcus Garvey, to the militancy of Malcolm X and the Black Panther Party, to the eloquence of Martin Luther King Jr. and much more—with essential lessons for today’s struggles.”

Part 2: Black Liberation and Socialism, chapters 5-7

Martin Luther King, Jr. linking arms with other marchers

MLK Day march against police terror

“This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism”
-Martin Luther King, Jr.

There is a state-sponsored war on Black lives in the United States and people across the country are demanding that it comes to an end. Join the Anti Police Terrorism Project for a jobs & economy march that reclaims King’s legacy of resistance!

#EndPoliceTerror

Silent protest at Oakland’s mayoral inauguration

Let Oakland’s new mayor, Libby Schaaf, know that there will be no business as usual until OPD stops its war on Black lives.

On Monday, January 5th, Ms. Schaaf will be inaugurated as Oakland’s mayor. We will convene outside the Paramount Theater as a silent wall along the sidewalk from BART to the entrance of the theater so that every guest of the Mayoral Inauguration knows that Oakland expects the new Mayor to have a zero tolerance policy when it comes to police terror in Oakland.

The Anti Police Terrorism Project asks attendees to join this silent protest, wear all black, join the line on the edge of the sidewalk and wear or hold your choice of signage.

Black Liberation and Socialism

Black Liberation and Socialism, Part 1

We are beginning a three-part reading series on Black Liberation and Socialism by Ahmed Shawki, “a sharp and insightful analysis of historic movements against racism in the United States—from the separatism of Marcus Garvey, to the militancy of Malcolm X and the Black Panther Party, to the eloquence of Martin Luther King Jr. and much more—with essential lessons for today’s struggles.”

Part 1 will focus on chapters 1-4.

Thousands march in Washington, D.C., after Darren Wilson was let off by a grand jury (Stephen D. Melkisethian)

The fight against racism returns to the streets

“THE AMERICAN people have this lesson to learn: Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe…Oppression makes even wise men mad and reckless; for illustration I pray look at East St. Louis.” The great Black abolitionist Frederick Douglass spoke these words in an 1886 speech on the theme of “Southern Barbarism.” And the city Douglass referenced so his audience would immediately understand what he was talking about is today  ...more